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Education Slice helps you stay ahead of essential education news shaping your profession. With a dedicated daily National Edition and three strategic State Editions in California, Texas and Florida, we bring our unique blend of AI and education expertise to research and monitor 100,000s of articles to share a summary of the most relevant and useful content to help you lead, innovate and grow.

From Kindergarten to K-12, Edtech news, school management and teaching strategies… Education Slice is the only trusted online news source in the US dedicated to covering current headlines, articles, reports and interviews to make sure you’re at the forefront of changes in the education industry.

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National
More public schools are now offering mental health services

Mental health services in U.S. schools were on the rise prior to the pandemic with more than half offering diagnostic assessments, according to a recent analysis. An analysis of the latest available federal data by the Pew Research Center found 55% of schools nationwide during the 2019-2020 school year provided assessments evaluating students for potential mental health conditions, a 4% increase from the previous school year. Services rendered varied both by geography and grade level, according to the data. Around two-thirds of middle schools and high schools offered mental health assessments, compared to just half of elementary schools. Further, more than 60% of schools in cities provide mental health assessments for their students, while 45% of rural schools did the same. Schools surveyed also detailed barriers preventing them from supplying their students with mental health services. More than half said they were limited in a major way by funding, while around 40% said services were cut short due to a lack of access to licensed professionals. A separate report released last week suggests around 1.5m U.S. children experienced depression or anxiety during the first year of the coronavirus pandemic alone. The 2022 KIDS COUNT Data Book, an annual report released Monday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, found a 26% jump in the number of children aged three to 17 struggling with the two conditions between 2016 and 2020. 

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Education Slice
California
New CDC COVID guidance aims for return to normalcy

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) loosened its COVID guidelines for isolation and testing in schools on Thursday. The CDC lifted previous recommendations that students quarantine if exposed to someone positive for the virus. The new guidance also drops recommendations that schools limit students’ contacts by cohorting them in groups during the day. And it said that schools should no longer conduct routine COVID testing for asymptomatic or unexposed students, suggesting schools consider doing that only in response to an outbreak, high community risk or a high-risk event at the school, like a prom or a large sports event. The new guidance ends last year’s “test-to-stay” recommendation that schools could test exposed students for the virus as a way to avoid quarantine, as well as its guidance that unvaccinated people or those not up to date on their vaccines quarantine after exposure. The agency’s general masking guidance for schools remains unchanged, recommending a mask in medium-level community risk areas for only immunocompromised or high-risk individuals or those with high-risk close contacts.

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Education Slice
Texas
New CDC COVID guidance aims for return to normalcy

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) loosened its COVID guidelines for isolation and testing in schools on Thursday. The CDC lifted previous recommendations that students quarantine if exposed to someone positive for the virus. The new guidance also drops recommendations that schools limit students’ contacts by cohorting them in groups during the day. And it said that schools should no longer conduct routine COVID testing for asymptomatic or unexposed students, suggesting schools consider doing that only in response to an outbreak, high community risk or a high-risk event at the school, like a prom or a large sports event. The new guidance ends last year’s “test-to-stay” recommendation that schools could test exposed students for the virus as a way to avoid quarantine, as well as its guidance that unvaccinated people or those not up to date on their vaccines quarantine after exposure. The agency’s general masking guidance for schools remains unchanged, recommending a mask in medium-level community risk areas for only immunocompromised or high-risk individuals or those with high-risk close contacts.

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Education Slice
Florida
New schools COVID guidance aims for 'return to normalcy'

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) loosened its COVID guidelines for isolation and testing in schools on Thursday. The CDC lifted previous recommendations that students quarantine if exposed to someone positive for the virus. The new guidance also drops recommendations that schools limit students’ contacts by cohorting them in groups during the day. And it said that schools should no longer conduct routine COVID testing for asymptomatic or unexposed students, suggesting schools consider doing that only in response to an outbreak, high community risk or a high-risk event at the school, like a prom or a large sports event. The new guidance ends last year’s “test-to-stay” recommendation that schools could test exposed students for the virus as a way to avoid quarantine, as well as its guidance that unvaccinated people or those not up to date on their vaccines quarantine after exposure. The agency’s general masking guidance for schools remains unchanged, recommending a mask in medium-level community risk areas for only immunocompromised or high-risk individuals or those with high-risk close contacts.

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