Education Slice

Education intelligence to lead, innovate & grow.

Want to get your daily slice of Education knowledge to your inbox? Sign up now

Education Slice helps you stay ahead of essential education news shaping your profession. With a dedicated daily National Edition and three strategic State Editions in California, Texas and Florida, we bring our unique blend of AI and education expertise to research and monitor 100,000s of articles to share a summary of the most relevant and useful content to help you lead, innovate and grow.

From Kindergarten to K-12, Edtech news, school management and teaching strategies… Education Slice is the only trusted online news source in the US dedicated to covering current headlines, articles, reports and interviews to make sure you’re at the forefront of changes in the education industry.

ES banner
Recent Editions
Education Slice
National
Roe v. Wade: how education groups reacted to SCOTUS decision

The U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday, removing the constitutional right to abortion that had been in place for nearly 50 years and setting off a chain of effects that could have wide-reaching consequences for schools, educators, and the children they serve. The 6-3 ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization will effectively ban abortions in 13 states that have passed so-called “trigger laws,” which were written to enact abortion restrictions upon the overruling of Roe. Several other states are expected to reintroduce bills that would do the same, while others move to firm up their own laws protecting abortion. On Friday, many education groups condemned the court’s decision, suggesting the opinion may be a precursor to future decisions related to LGBTQ marriage, gender equality, and birth control. The order is “another example of how, over the last few years, we have seen the same faction of politicians working overtime to reverse decades of progress on racial justice, on women’s rights, on worker’s rights, on LGBTQ+ rights, on voting rights, on our right to privacy, and on our students’ freedom to learn in our public schools,” National Education Association President Becky Pringle said in a statement. “These attacks on our freedoms are designed to do one thing—consolidate unfettered power into the hands of a few,” Pringle said. “We must stand up for all of our rights.” American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten linked the Dobbs ruling to other recent Supreme Court decisions this week, including those on states’ firearm laws and public funding for students to attend religious schools. “In the span of 24 hours, this court ruled that states can’t regulate gun owners but can regulate the bodies of anyone who can reproduce,” she said. Other groups celebrated the decision. Students for Life, an anti-abortion advocacy group, said in a statement that the ruling represented a “historic moment that will determine the fate of millions of precious children,” noting plans to push for legislation that would restrict abortion at the state level. Pro-abortion rights student activists also pledged to lobby state lawmakers. In a statement, the anti-gun-violence organization March for Our Lives called the ruling a “racist,” “classist,” attack. “We have organized before and won, and we will organize again to protect our right to be free of gun violence and choose what we do with our bodies,” it said.

Full Issue
es-recent-california
Education Slice
California
Congress extends pandemic-era school lunch waivers

Congress on Friday passed a bill to extend a pandemic-era program through the summer that provided free meals to students regardless of income. The $3bn Keep Kids Fed Act, passed 376-42 by the House on Thursday, was amended and approved by the Senate, and passed in the House by a voice vote the following day. The measure also provides schools with a higher reimbursement rate per meal for the next school year and offers more flexible guidelines for school nutrition programs coping with supply chain problems and short staffing. However, it also reinstates a requirement, suspended during the pandemic, that low-income students above the poverty line pay a reduced price for their meals, rather than getting them free. The provision was added to the bill at the request of Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY). In addition to extending waivers for the 2022 summer meal program, the bill increases federal reimbursements for every school lunch by 40 cents and every school breakfast by 15 cents, above the annual inflationary adjustment. It extends waivers for schools unable to meet nutrition standards due to supply chain disruptions and to reduce administrative and reporting burdens.

Full Issue
es-recent-texas
Education Slice
Texas
Congress extends pandemic-era school lunch waivers

Congress on Friday passed a bill to extend a pandemic-era program through the summer that provided free meals to students regardless of income. The $3bn Keep Kids Fed Act, passed 376-42 by the House on Thursday, was amended and approved by the Senate, and passed in the House by a voice vote the following day. The measure also provides schools with a higher reimbursement rate per meal for the next school year and offers more flexible guidelines for school nutrition programs coping with supply chain problems and short staffing. However, it also reinstates a requirement, suspended during the pandemic, that low-income students above the poverty line pay a reduced price for their meals, rather than getting them free. The provision was added to the bill at the request of Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY). In addition to extending waivers for the 2022 summer meal program, the bill increases federal reimbursements for every school lunch by 40 cents and every school breakfast by 15 cents, above the annual inflationary adjustment. It extends waivers for schools unable to meet nutrition standards due to supply chain disruptions and to reduce administrative and reporting burdens.

Full Issue
es-recent-florida
Education Slice
Florida
Summer Literacy Institute celebrates Florida educators' important role

Education Commissioner Manny Diaz, Jr. and the Florida Department of Education have launched the Summer Literacy Institute, a three-day professional learning event that celebrates educators and supports districts and schools with effectively implementing literacy instruction. The Institute is organized to provide professional development for literacy leadership teams at the early childhood, school and district levels. The goals of the Summer Literacy Institute include increasing educator knowledge of Florida’s B.E.S.T. (Benchmarks for Excellent Student Thinking) English Language Arts Standards, sharing evidence-based best practices, and providing access to associated literacy resources, including those that promote at-home reading and family engagement. Notably, the legislature has invested $202.5m for literacy achievement in the state’s new 2022-23 Freedom First Budget, including $170m for the reading allocation, $29m for the New Worlds Reading Scholarship Program, $2.5m for State Regional Literacy Directors, $1m for online literacy professional development administered through Just Read, Florida!

Full Issue
top-shadow
Read the latest Education highlights